New Music 20x12
20 outstanding new works, each lasting 12 minutes, commissioned to feature centre stage of the London 2012 Cultural Olympiad.

Richard CaustonRichard Causton

Twenty-Seven Heavens

Twenty-Seven Heavens explores Blake's Jerusalem in which the poet parallels aspects of his mythological world with various districts of London, including Hackney, Bow and Stratford. The twenty-seven heavens are layers of obscurity which the individual must penetrate to see the vision of Eternity – an idea which has resonance for both the artist and the athlete.

New Music 20x12 is the brainchild of Jillian Barker and David Cohen who wanted to put new music at the heart of the Olympic celebrations in 2012. It is delivered by PRS for Music Foundation in partnership with BBC Radio 3, London 20x12 and NMC Recordings. For a full list of funding partners click here.

 

About Richard Causton

Richard Causton was born in London in 1971 and studied with Jeremy Dale Roberts, Param Vir and Roger Marsh at the University of York, the Royal College of Music and the Scuola Civica in Milan. He has worked with world renowned performers such as the BBC Symphony Orchestra, City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, Sinfonieorchester Basel, London Sinfonietta, and the Nash Ensemble.

He has been the recipient of awards including First Prize in the International 'Nuove Sincronie' competition, the Mendelssohn Scholarship and a 2004 British Composer Award in the Best Instrumental Work category for Seven States of Rain (recorded for NMC by Darragh Morgan). He was founder of the Royal College of Music Gamelan Programme and held the Fellow Commonership in the Creative Arts at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Causton founded and runs the Royal College of Music Gamelan Programme and has written Concerto for Solo Percussion and Gamelan, which was given its first performance at the 2001 Cheltenham Music Festival with Evelyn Glennie as the soloist.

Notable works include Phoenix (2006), for the London Sinfonietta, which won the 2006 Royal Philharmonic Society Award for Chamber-Scale Composition; As Kingfishers Catch Fire (2007), for the Britten Sinfonia; and the Chamber Symphony (2009), commissioned by BCMG, and given its London premiere by the Philharmonia Orchestra in 2011 as part of its Music of Today concert series.

(c)Charles Muellersmall

 

European Union Youth Orchestra

The European Union Youth Orchestra is one of the world’s most prestigious and dynamic Orchestras. It unites Europe’s most talented young musicians from all 27 EU countries, under some of the world’s most famous conductors, in an Orchestra which transcends cultural boundaries and performs all over the world. The level demanded of the players, combined with the renowned musical leadership of its conductors, has won the EUYO an outstanding musical and educational reputation and regular comparisons with the world’s finest Orchestras.

 

Gianandrea Noseda conductor

 

 

Twenty Seven Heavens

The performance of Twenty-Seven Heavens by the EUYO at the Usher Hall, Edinburgh was recorded by the BBC on 23 August 2012 and broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on 25 August 2012.

This work is available on NMC in mp3 and FLAC download formats. (See below)

 

 

 

VIDEO

Richard Causton and European Union Youth Orchestra

MUSIC MAP

FUNDERS

 

Special thanks to the RVW Trust for making this New Music 20x12 commission possible. New Music 20x12 is the brainchild of Jillian Barker and David Cohen who wanted to put new music at the heart of the Olympic celebrations in 2012. It is delivered by PRS for Music Foundation in partnership with BBC Radio 3, London 20x12 and NMC Recordings. For a full list of funding partners click here.

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