New Music Biennial 2017
Bite-sized pieces of new music

Laurence CraneLaurence Crane

Pieces about Art

'Fabulously cool, contained and superbly sung' The Guardian

 

Composition Professor at the Guildhall School of Music & Drama, Laurence Crane was commissioned by EXAUDI vocal ensemble in 2014 to write a new work for them. Initially wanting to use words that had been written by a famous American artist, engraved on a metal sculpture exhibited in a show in the late 1960s, Laurence was denied permission to use the text. Immediately putting his disappointment to one side, Laurence made the decision to write a text based on this permission email while concealing the artist’s name from the score. It is a piece which is all about the composers struggle to get permission to set the text. There are sections of wordless music in this movement, perhaps suggesting that if permission had been granted then this is where the artist’s words would be.

 

About Laurence Crane

Laurence Crane was born in Oxford in 1961 and studied composition with Peter Nelson and Nigel Osborne at Nottingham University. He lives and works in London. His music is mainly written for the concert hall, although his list of works includes pieces written for film, radio, theatre, dance and installation.

 

The performance of Pieces about Art will be broadcast on BBC Radio 3 on 1 July 2017

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