CATEGORIES

News

NMC Recordings, the leading charity record label devoted to the promotion of British contemporary classical music, seeks to appoint an Executive Director. We will be saying goodbye to Anne Rushton, our Executive Director of over 17 years, at the end of the year and following a restructure are offering a one-year fixed term appointment.

 

 

NMC RECORDINGS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Full time one year fixed term position

Starting November 2020

Salary: £40k-£50k

 

The Executive Director will be responsible to the Chair and Board of Trustees for the leadership and strategic direction of the charity and to:

- Develop organisational sustainability, through monitoring NMC's fundraising strategy and overseeing the cultivation of strategic partnerships that contribute to a resilient business model.

- Oversee the delivery of artistic and education projects and partnerships which ensure the charity fulfils its mission.

- Provide leadership in all aspects of company management and the administration of NMC.

- Manage the NMC team.

 

Full details, how to apply and Equal Opportunities Form can be found here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0t272hzdkomqueb/AAAE5lQOqXDFv0dggat9WImUa?dl=0

 

Interested candidates should send a CV and covering letter (no more than two sides of A4 each), outlining their interest and suitability for the role, plus a completed Equal Opportunities Monitoring Form to: Mr Chris Potts, NMC Trustee: chris@counterculturellp.com

A preliminary informal phone conversation with our existing Executive Director, Anne Rushton, who will not form part of the interview process, may be possible for interested candidates. Requests should be emailed to anne@nmcrec.co.uk and calls will be scheduled where possible.

 

Closing date: Monday 24 August - 9am deadline
First interviews: Thursday 3 September, in London or via Zoom
Second interviews: Tuesday 8 September (pm), in London or via Zoom

 

 

NB: Our office is on the 3rd floor of an old building, with no lift access. Please contact us if you wish to discuss access issues.

News

Following a successful pilot, we are pleased to announce our first official NMC Listening Club. Composer Emily Howard will be joined online by pianist Alexandra Dariescu and mathematician, writer and presenter Marcus du Sautoy to take a deep dive into Emily Howard's debut album Magnetite, released on NMC in 2016.

 

As well as analysing the music, our guests will discuss the influences behind the pieces on the album: the oldest known magnetic substance (Magnetite), energy and solar flares (Solar) and the pioneering mathematician Ada Lovelace (Mesmerism). Viewers of the live stream will be able to leave comments and ask questions in the YouTube chat room feature.

Tune in via YouTube on 2 July at 19:00 (GMT+1)

https://youtu.be/0Spo5V7Qtnc

Submit your questions for our guests in advance at nmc@nmcrec.co.uk or during the live stream.

News

We're excited to introduce our new NMC Listening Club series. Taking place virtually during this time of social distancing, in each session we’ll be exploring selected releases from our back catalogue, in conversation with the composers and artists involved in their creation.  


For our first NMC Listening Club, Colin Matthews and Lucy Walker (Head of Public Engagement, Red House) guide us through the 2007 award-winning release Britten on Film (NMC D112). The album collects all the surviving music Benjamin Britten wrote during the 1930s for various organisations such as the General Post Office and Southern Railways.  

NMC Listening Club took place as a live stream for NMC donors/supporters via YouTube on Wednesday 13 May. You can rewatch the broadcast here: 


Future NMC Listening Club events will be announced via our enewletter (sign up here) and socials. Tune in to watch live and send in your questions to our guests.
 

We'd love to know what you think? Watch the broadcast and complete this short survey. Thank you.
https://forms.gle/ffeYp3wmkuSWZyxj6

News

We are delighted to share the news that Edmund Finnis's Debut Discs albumThe Air, Turning has won the 2020 BBC Music Magazine 'Premiere Award'. 

Described as 'a striking collection of works ... richly mysterious and compelling' (The Guardian) this debut album from Finnis reached No. 3 in the Official Specialist Classical Charts and No. 29 in the Classic FM Charts. Congratulations to Edmund, all the incredible artists involved and the recording engineers and producers. A big thank you to the Trusts, Foundations and individuals who have invested in this recording and NMC’s Debut Discs series.

 

The awards ceremony was due to take place at Kings Place, London last month but was understandably cancelled. Here is Edmund Finnis accepting the award from his home.

 

 

Finnis

 

 

 

Related Recordings

The Air, Turning
News

In this week's NMC Archive blog composer Colin Riley tells us about his compositional process. His first album on NMC, Shenanigans, was released in 2017. 


Colin RileyWry, Fond, Understated and Slightly Bonkers


The primary drive to create, at least for me, is to put some bit of myself out into the world. This might be into the air of a concert space, into the fingers or breath of a performer, or into the ear and brain of a listener. 


The music that I create therefore partly takes into account these spaces, fingers, breaths, ears and brains during its formation. But my compositional process is also fired by something else. It is cajoled along out of a desire to make something for me; music that is constructed and sounds the way I wish it to be. This is probably what I would describe as the inward (perhaps almost selfish) drive, where your own fascinations are explored.


As a composer it is very important to keep hold of these guiding fascinations (because they are after all, what is pumping the creativity), but we must also listen to the outward (listener-facing) drive at the same time. So, I find myself balancing fundamental technical questions about forming ‘the music I want to hear’ with pragmatic ones; is this passage appropriate for the instrument? Will this particular approach excite or deflate the performer? What will the listener specifically get from this musical moment on a single listen? Does the overall piece create the impact I intend? In the heat of creative battle, when you are pulling together lots of bits of paper, lists of ideas, drawings, audio recordings on the phone, half-remembered ideas in your head, and clumsy fumbles on the piano, keeping the balance is sometimes difficult. 


So a piece of music gets completed. If we’re lucky it gets rehearsed and there is a performance in front of an audience.


All creators are interested in some kind of reaction to their work and this takes many forms. At a performance, the level of applause is obviously a direct indicator. Equally it is always lovely to have feedback from your performers. If you’re fortunate enough to get a review, this takes reaction to an even higher and more dangerous level. Potentially people will read a review and base their assumptions about you not on music they have actually heard, but on what has been filtered by a single person. If it goes badly (and a reviewer has an axe to grind) then your personal feelings can be severely damaged. If it goes well, it creates a slightly unreal sense of hype; something which, after the struggles of composing, seems bizarre and potentially out of place. Either way, as composers we have to take the rough with the smooth and use the good reviews as some kind of official validation of worth, however selective we may be in this. The review that all composers prize most is one that is intelligent, addresses the musical content and understands where you’re coming from. I was lucky enough to receive such a review in the Guardian. Thank you Kate Molleson! 


It’s hard to describe your own music, but I thank Kate for making a very good stab at this on my behalf. The music of my latest release Shenanigans was described as ‘taut’, ‘wonky’ and ‘endearing’ and this is, of course, very complimentary. What I was most warmed by was a clear recognition of the contradictions between seriousness and play (something I value similarly in my favourite comedy) and between the collisions of musical aesthetics in my music. These two things have probably driven my composing more than any other over the last twenty years. 


As well as my thanks to Kate Molleson for understanding me, and to NMC for trusting me, my thanks also goes to all the spaces the music was conceived and recorded in, the fingers and breaths of the wonderful performers on Shenanigans, and to the ears and brains of all those out there who might come across my music.

Colin Riley Shenanigans

NMC Archive blogs are all articles written for our Friends Newsletter over the years. If you'd like to receive our quarterly Friends Newsletter, you can become a Friend here (memberships start from £50). If you'd like to support our work with composers as well as our expanding Learning Programme, you can make a donation to our 30th Appeal here. Thank you!

 

 

News

As we reach the end of our anniversary year, we look to the future. Our pledge is to continue to support new music, build a catalogue that celebrates and fully reflects talent across modern Britain, and develop our education programmes. Find out more below ...

 

 

Inclusivity

Where we are now:

Our complete catalogue   

             In the last 5 years
Men/women        men/women2


Target

Anniversary Target

We pledge to take steps to ensure our future recording programme is more representative across gender and race. Recent analysis highlighted that 90% of proposals we were receiving were from men, so we have taken steps to redress the balance by promoting our opportunities more broadly, and have set a target that at least 50% of new releases from 2020 will feature composers who identify as women. Alongside this we have made a commitment to double the number of BAME composers in the catalogue (currently 19) by 2022.

 

 

 

educationEducation

In 2017, we launched a series of education resources to assist the development of emerging talent and to inspire an interest in, and appreciation of, new music in younger audiences. These resources include: r:strng, our free app featuring Kate Whitley's music and allowing students from KS3 & KS4 to create their own remixes; GCSE Dance, a free teaching resource developed in partnership with Rambert Dance Company and including guidance notes for teachers as well as a free download album; the NMC Music Map, our free interactive tool to explore, see, and hear the connections between composers; and GCSE Composition, which takes works from the NMC catalogue as a starting point for practical lessons and student exercises in Rhinegold Education's innovative Online Music Classroom. 

 

In 2019, we were delighted to partner with London Music Masters, to deliver Many Voices, a set of ten new violin pieces for children for those currently learning at around ABRSM Grades 2 – 5, which was distributed to LMM’s learning programme of over 1,000 children, as part of their 10th anniversary celebrations and NMC’s 30th anniversary. 

In a time where we are seeing cuts to both music education and our relations with other cultures, the creation of Many Voices seems more admirable and important than ever.” – Joanna Lee

 

In March 2019, NMC worked with Chineke! Foundation and Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service to devise and deliver 3 days of creative music-making workshops for 40 pupils aged 11-14 from Swanlea School in Whitechapel. 

The project was linked to a forthcoming album of works by Black and Minority Ethnic composers performed by Chineke! Orchestra on NMC, and we were thrilled to have composer Errollyn Wallen lead the project along with five musicians from the orchestra. The participants were introduced to the working life of an orchestra by Chineke! Learning Manager Ishani O’Connor, as well as learning about what it is like to be a professional musician and what being a composer means.

My favourite part was when everyone was gathering together to put all their pieces together. It made a really shocking and wonderful performance, [it was] very creative for all of us.” – Swanlea School Participant

 

Errollyn at Swanlea SchoolPianist at Swanlea School

 

For our Anniversary year, we pledge to continue to develop our education programme, with projects in partnership with Chineke! Foundation as well as schools across London already in preparation for 2020.

 

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