ARTISTS

van de Wiel, Mark

Mark
van de Wiel
clarinet

Mark van de Wiel was born in Northampton, and educated at Merton College, Oxford and the Royal College of Music. He was immediately appointed principal clarinettist with the Welsh National Opera and subsequently with Glyndebourne Touring Opera. Since 2000 he has been Principal Clarinet with the Philharmonia Orchestra and was appointed principal with the London Sinfonietta in 2002.

As a soloist he has performed with the Philharmonia, London Sinfonietta, London Chamber Orchestra (in La Scala, Milan), Thames Chamber Orchestra, Mozart Festival Orchestra (on a major UK tour), Welsh National Opera Orchestra, English Classical Players, Arhus Orchestra, Belgrade Strings, and the Birmingham Contemporary Music Group. He is particularly well known for his performances of contemporary music, and has given many premières. Solo highlights this season include the UK première of Sir John Taverner's Cantus Mysticus with the London Sinfonietta at the Proms, the London première of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies' Clarinet Quintet with the Brodsky Quartet at Kings Place, Graham Fitkin's Agnostic with the London Chamber Orchestra at St. John's Smith Square, and the Mozart Concerto with the Mozart Festival Orchestra in the UK and Switzerland.

Mark was principal clarinettist with the Composers’ Ensemble from 1992-2000, and has been principal clarinettist with the Endymion Ensemble since its formation. He is also principal with the London Chamber Orchestra. He has appeared for several years as the clarinet and basset horn soloist in the production of Mozart’s La Clemenza di Tito at the Bavarian State Opera in Munich.

Mark's services to music have been recognised with an Honorary Associateship from the Royal Academy of Music, where he is a Professor, and with an Honorary Doctorate from Northampton University.

London Sinfonietta

London Sinfonietta

The London Sinfonietta's mission is to place the best contemporary classical music at the heart of today's culture; engaging and challenging the public through inspiring performances of the highest standard, and taking risks to develop new work and talent.

The ensemble is Resident Orchestra at Southbank Centre with headquarters at Kings Place, and continues to take the best contemporary music to venues and festivals across the UK and worldwide with a busy touring schedule. Since its inaugural concert in 1968 - giving the world premiere of Sir John Tavener's The Whale - the London Sinfonietta's commitment to making new music has seen it commission over 300 works, and premiere many hundreds more.
The core of the London Sinfonietta is 18 Principal Players, representing some of the best solo and ensemble musicians in the world. The ensemble has just launched its Emerging Artists Programme, which will give professional musicians at the start of promising and brilliant careers the opportunity to work alongside those Principal Players on stage across the season.

The London Sinfonietta's recordings present a catalogue of 20th-century classics, on numerous prestigious labels as well as the ensemble's own London Sinfonietta Label. Most recently, a performance of Philip Cashian's Piano Concerto was released on NMC.

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COMPOSER:

DESCRIPTION

Matt Rogers writes ...

Orac is a piece of instrumental rhetoric inspired partly by the idea of early computer-generated music. It attempts to create the sense of a discreet algorithm at work, a computer program designed to give the impression that the music was written by a human composer – which of course it was, but in this case a human composer who wishes to give the impression that there is a discreet algorithm at work, which there is not. As such, the music can also be considered coded data, broadcast via soundwaves and ripe with information, ready for interpretation by any system capable of reading it.

Orac takes its name from one of my favourite fictional computers, a character in the 1970s BBC Television science fiction series Blake's 7.

RECORDING CREDITS

Recorded on 1 December 2015 at All Saints East Finchley, London.

Producer/engineer DAVID LEFEBER

Catalogue number:
NMC DL3020
Release Date:
22 April 2016