Patrick John Jones

Patrick John Jones

Patrick John Jones was born in London in 1989. He writes music for acoustic instruments that is most often performed in concert halls and occasionally in museums, art galleries, and libraries

His work has been described as ‘strange, eerie…expressive’ (Britten Sinfonia Blog), ‘assured…compelling’ (Bachtrack), ‘acerbic’ (The Guardian) and ‘remarkably fresh’ (The Philharmonia Blog).

His recent music over the lockdowns of 2020-21 has been made for recording projects. This includes Eel — a solo piano piece dedicated to the garden eels at a Tokyo aquarium that received visitors over Zoom, released on Bandcamp as part of the Twenty Piano album compilation — The Fun Will Never End — written for four London Symphony Orchestra players — and Swoop for solo viola — filmed as part of Psappha’s ‘Composing For’ YouTube series.

Patrick is currently working on a new orchestral piece as part of the London Symphony Orchestra’s Panufnik Scheme and a song for Jessica Summers, commissioned by the York Late Music Concert Series. His music has been performed by many leading artists and ensembles, including the Britten Sinfonia, Ensemble 10/10, the Philharmonia Orchestra, Quatuor Diotima, Mahan Esfahani, The Kreutzer Quartet, Octandre, Psappha, the Tritium Trio, the Berkeley Ensemble, and the Ulysses Ensemble. It has been broadcast on BBC Radio 3, and performed at the Aldeburgh Festival 2018 (Britten Studio, Snape), Royal Festival Hall (London), Wigmore Hall (London), Milton Court (London), Foundling Museum (London), Epstein Theatre (Liverpool), National Centre for Early Music (York), Capstone Theatre (Liverpool), and the Burgess Foundation (Manchester).

He was a joint winner of the Calefax Composers Competition 2020, and received the RPS Composition Prize in 2015 and the Britten Sinfonia’s OPUS award in 2014. Some of his scores have been published by the University of York Music Press, including Prayer (1) for soprano, alto and male voice (2020) and Uhtceare for flute, percussion, violin and cello (2016). Uhtceare was also recorded and released as part of the Dark Inventions album ‘Firewheel’ in 2016.

Patrick was an artist-in-residence at the The John Rylands Research Institute from November 2019-February 2020, exploring the ways in which archival material (such as illuminated Medieval manuscripts) can be part of the process of writing music. He completed a PhD in Composition from 2013-2017 at the University of York, supervised by Dr Thomas Simaku and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Prior to this, he completed an MMus in composition at Kings College London and a BA (Hons) in Music at the University of York. He has taken part in a number of courses and summer schools for emerging composers, including the advanced composition course at Dartington Summer School (2019), taught by Harrison Birtwistle, the Britten-Pears Composition Course (2017), taught by Oliver Knussen, Colin Matthews, and Michael Gandolfi, and the Philharmonia Academy (2015-16), mentored by Unsuk Chin.

Biography

Patrick John Jones was born in London in 1989. He writes music for acoustic instruments that is most often performed in concert halls and occasionally in museums, art galleries, and libraries

His work has been described as ‘strange, eerie…expressive’ (Britten Sinfonia Blog), ‘assured…compelling’ (Bachtrack), ‘acerbic’ (The Guardian) and ‘remarkably fresh’ (The Philharmonia Blog).

His recent music over the lockdowns of 2020-21 has been made for recording projects. This includes Eel — a solo piano piece dedicated to the garden eels at a Tokyo aquarium that received visitors over Zoom, released on Bandcamp as part of the Twenty Piano album compilation — The Fun Will Never End — written for four London Symphony Orchestra players — and Swoop for solo viola — filmed as part of Psappha’s ‘Composing For’ YouTube series.

Patrick is currently working on a new orchestral piece as part of the London Symphony Orchestra’s Panufnik Scheme and a song for Jessica Summers, commissioned by the York Late Music Concert Series. His music has been performed by many leading artists and ensembles, including the Britten Sinfonia, Ensemble 10/10, the Philharmonia Orchestra, Quatuor Diotima, Mahan Esfahani, The Kreutzer Quartet, Octandre, Psappha, the Tritium Trio, the Berkeley Ensemble, and the Ulysses Ensemble. It has been broadcast on BBC Radio 3, and performed at the Aldeburgh Festival 2018 (Britten Studio, Snape), Royal Festival Hall (London), Wigmore Hall (London), Milton Court (London), Foundling Museum (London), Epstein Theatre (Liverpool), National Centre for Early Music (York), Capstone Theatre (Liverpool), and the Burgess Foundation (Manchester).

He was a joint winner of the Calefax Composers Competition 2020, and received the RPS Composition Prize in 2015 and the Britten Sinfonia’s OPUS award in 2014. Some of his scores have been published by the University of York Music Press, including Prayer (1) for soprano, alto and male voice (2020) and Uhtceare for flute, percussion, violin and cello (2016). Uhtceare was also recorded and released as part of the Dark Inventions album ‘Firewheel’ in 2016.

Patrick was an artist-in-residence at the The John Rylands Research Institute from November 2019-February 2020, exploring the ways in which archival material (such as illuminated Medieval manuscripts) can be part of the process of writing music. He completed a PhD in Composition from 2013-2017 at the University of York, supervised by Dr Thomas Simaku and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Prior to this, he completed an MMus in composition at Kings College London and a BA (Hons) in Music at the University of York. He has taken part in a number of courses and summer schools for emerging composers, including the advanced composition course at Dartington Summer School (2019), taught by Harrison Birtwistle, the Britten-Pears Composition Course (2017), taught by Oliver Knussen, Colin Matthews, and Michael Gandolfi, and the Philharmonia Academy (2015-16), mentored by Unsuk Chin.

External Links

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